The camera that doubles as a TELESCOPE: Nikon’s Coolpix 83x zoom camera is so powerful it can see the moon ‘moving’

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Forget using a telescope to peer into the sky. If you want to see the moon, all you really need is a camera.

A video captured using Nikon’s Coolpix P900 reveals how the device’s 83x zoom lens can film the moon appearing to move – an illusion created by the Earth’s rotation.

The one minute 50 seconds footage, which gone viral since it was uploaded by a German photographer, also shows the moon craters in detail.

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The $600 (£380) Nikon P900 camera was launched in March this year and is able to capture such stunning footage with the help of its ‘Super Zoom’.

Its powerful zoom is expandable up to 166x with something known as the ‘Dynamic Fine Zoom’ feature.

DIY Photography notes that photographer Lothar Lenz used this 166x digital zoom to get even closer to the moon.

Given that Earth’s satellite is roughly 238,900 miles (384,400 km) away, the feat has impressed both amateur and professional photographers in a Reddit thread.

The $600 (£380) Nikon P900 camera was launched in March this year and is able to capture such stunning footage with the help of its 'Super Zoom'. The one minute 50 seconds footage, which gone viral since it was uploaded by a German photographer, shows the moon craters in detail

The $600 (£380) Nikon P900 camera was launched in March this year and is able to capture such stunning footage with the help of its ‘Super Zoom’. The one minute 50 seconds footage, which gone viral since it was uploaded by a German photographer, shows the moon craters in detail

A video captured using Nikon's Coolpix P900 (right) reveals how the device's 83x zoom lens can see the moon appearing to move (left) A video captured using Nikon's Coolpix P900 (right) reveals how the device's 83x zoom lens can see the moon appearing to move (left)

While the image isn’t as sharp, the lunar surface can still be seen clearly.

This is done with the help of a backlit 16 million pixels CMOS image sensor that works alongside optical vibration reduction technology.

The 4-2000-mm zoom lens has an aperture of f/2.8 at the wide end up to f/6.5 when zoomed fully.

When fully extended, the lens doubles the length of the camera.

Lenz, who goes by the username Naturbeobachtungen von Lothar Lenz on YouTube, has amassed 2 million views since posted the video to YouTube.

(dailymail.co.uk)

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