The best GPS running watches – UPDATE 2017

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The best running watch or GPS sports watch is a really personal choice and depends on the amount of detail and stats you want from your workouts. And there’s so much choice right now. But we’ve run and sweated with every running watch out there to build up an exhaustive mix of running watch reviews.

Beyond just simple pace and distance information, the latest watches will feed back everything from heart rate data to detailed observations of your running style. In short, GPS watches have become an essential tool in the runner’s arsenal.

The best GPS running watches

Some are pricey, some are cheap and more affordable. But even entry level running watches are now coming with surprisingly advanced features. Heart rate monitors are now coming built in as standard – which enables you to start heart rate training – and increasingly swimming and cycling modes are being added too.

Of course there’s no one perfect watch, so we’ve highlighted our top picks below, but also followed up with other devices that have impressed during our tests and that might suit different budgets and preferences.

1. TomTom Spark 3 – Top pick

The best GPS running watches

We loved the original TomTom Spark and the follow up is now our top-rated running watch. As well as the usual running metrics (distance, speed, time), its optical heart rate monitor aced our tests, and it plugs into nearly every running app going. But it’s perhaps the storage for MP3s, which it’ll play via a pair of wireless headphones, which tips the Spark for us. The feeling of running unencumbered by your phone isn’t to be underestimated.

The new version also has a Route Exploration feature, which enables you to upload GPX routes (you can quickly make one in Strava or Map My Run) and follow them from the watch. It’s a nifty feature and really useful for getting out and exploring new areas.

It’s not without its issues. Pairing is still a real nightmare (we actually do this via a cable to our PC/Macs now to save blood vessels popping). But its solid stats, improved app, great heart rate sensor and extensive list of extra features earn the Spark its place at the head of our list.

While it’s not as good or comprehensive as the Garmin Fenix 5 (below), it is less than half the price, so for most runners the TomTom Spark 3 gets the nod as our favoured watch.

£219.99/$330, tomtom.com | Amazon

2. Garmin Fenix 5 – Ultimate running watch

The best GPS running watches

Joining the slimmer, more female-friendly Fenix 5S and the hulking Fenix 5X, the Fenix 5 once again reigns supreme, packing in the usual fix of advanced running metrics as well as some new ones.

Aside from the bog standard data we’ve come to expect from Garmin’s run-friendly watches, it includes every data metric going, with Training Effect scores after every workout, recommended rest periods, Training Status (whether you’re improving, maintaining or declining in fitness) and resting heart rate, logged over the day and week.

It also builds in a optical heart rate sensor, which isn’t quite gold standard and might still persuade you to pair a chest strap for more reliable heart rate readings in HIIT workouts.

The list of tracked sports is equally mind-boggling, and if you find it too chunky, try the all-new, slimmer, Garmin Fenix 5S.

£499.99/$750, garmin.com | Amazon

3. Garmin Forerunner 35 – Best for basics

The best GPS running watches

High-end running watch features are tumbling onto entry level devices at a terrific rate, and there’s no better evidence than the Garmin Forerunner 35. Propping up the Garmin GPS watch line-up, the natural successor to the Forerunner 25 adds notifications, heart rate, all-day activity and a host of training modes.

We’ve already published our Garmin Forerunner 35 review and for beginner to mid-range runners, there’s no better device on the market. While it eschews the detailed sports science data offered by the Forerunner 630 and multisport modes of the Vivoactive, it tracks pace, distance, heart rate zones and time for running and cycling, and is water resistant to 5ATM.

While its $200 price tag has been usurped by the new Polar M200, we’d still opt for Garmin’s budget running watch as it boasts most of the features you need.

£169.99/$255, garmin.com | Amazon

4. Polar V800 – Best for data

The best GPS running watches

The perfect training timepiece for swim-bike-runners, the Polar V800 tracks everything you do on two wheels or two feet, in the water or on dry land. Pace, distance, fat burn calories and max heart rate are all covered on super-clear screens that are brilliantly customisable.

Pair it up with a Polar H7 or new H10 heart rate monitor and you can also unlock the V800’s zonal training smarts, making sure you’re sweating it out to achieve the right effect.

Hook it up to a shoe pod and it’ll also give you cadence, stride length and other insights to help hone your Mo Farah running form. Wannabe Wiggos can also opt for a range of cycle accessories to increase the stats haul from two-wheeled training.

What it reveals while you work out is one thing, but this smartwatch keeps giving long after you’ve sunk your post-workout protein shake. The Recovery Status and Orthostatic Test features predict when you’ll be ready to train again. There’s also a running program that adapts if you can’t fit in a run and includes exercise routines to aid recovery. V800 also doubles as an activity tracker and lets you see whether your daily calorie burn comes from just being alive, workouts or general activity.

£389/$583, polar.com | Amazon

5. Polar M200 – Best on a budget

The best GPS running watches

Basically a more affordable take on the Polar V800, the M200 is the successor to the Polar M400 and will track pace, distance and altitude via built-in GPS. It also boasts an optical heart rate monitor. But that’s not all, as this beautiful looking running companion comes with some special skills too.

On top of 24/7 activity tracking that means you can ditch your fitness band, there’s a whole host of running-specific innovations to keep you moving and motivated.

There’s heart rate based training, the ability to set individual targets and you can even compare your current speed with the world record marathon speed.

For those who get lost easily or often run on their travels, there’s a cunning back-to-start option that’ll directs you to your starting point in the shortest distance possible.

If you’re looking for improved performance – and most of us are – the Polar Running Index calculates how you’re (hopefully) improving over time based on heart rate and speed. It’ll also tell you the training effect of every single run.

£129.50/$195, polar.com | Amazon

6. Garmin Forerunner 630 – Best for insights

The best GPS running watches

Garmin’s flagship watch adds smartphone notifications as well as a host of new metrics. You can view data on stride length and vertical ratio which can be used to boost running efficiency, and there’s a renewed focus on recovery.

The Forerunner 630 rates lactate threshold and performance condition to try and prevent overtraining, and warns you when you’re pushing things too far. It’s strictly for the hardcore runner who also wants great smartwatch-inspired features.

Downsides include a lack of built-in HR monitor, which means you’ll have to wear a chest strap if you want the extra data. In an ideal world we’d rather have the possibility of both, but there are few options out there that offer the same breadth of data as the Forerunner 630. If you’ve got the money to spend, it’s still one of the best running watches available.

£329.99/$495, garmin.com | Amazon

7. TomTom Adventurer – Best for trails

The best GPS running watches

With a dedicated trail running mode (alongside running, hiking, skiing and open workouts), the TomTom Adventurer is a great option for those who like to run off the beaten track. Altitude and elevation are tracked in trail mode and you can access a live compass, which is great when you’re running with only fields in every direction. But most useful is the ability to add and follow GPX routes, which can help you get into the wild without getting lost.

£249.99/$375, tomtom.com | Amazon

8. Polar M600 – Best smartwatch

The best GPS running watches

The Polar M600 is very much a Polar running watch first andAndroid Wear smartwatch second. It’s unashamedly a fitness device, so much so that it’s almost inaccurate to compare it to the current crop of smartwatches at all.

The first thing you’ll need to do is get Polar Flow hooked up, and you can enter the company’s fitness platform from a dedicated button on the watch. One push fires up the app on your phone, which is your gateway to tracking runs and workouts. GPS run tracking is on the money and the stats and metrics the excellent Flow app provide post-run make it the top smartwatch for runners.

£264.50/$396, polar.com | Amazon

9. Garmin Vivoactive HR – Best for multisport

The best GPS running watches

The Garmin Vivoactive HR really does do it all. Run, bike, pool swim, golf, walk, row, SUP (paddle board) ski, XC ski, run indoor, bike indoor, walk indoor and row indoor – it’s a formidable sports watch for those who don’t define themselves as runners or cyclists.

The GPS-based sports are all well catered for and while it’s not a patch on a dedicated golf watch, you can get your distances to the pin as well as hazards, as long as you download the course via Garmin Connect.

Smartwatch style notifications and the ability to read emails and messages are the order of the day, and of course, the built-in HR makes for much richer data, especially from niche sports. Yes, it’s a bit of a jack-of-all-trades, but it’s one of the best sports watches out there, as long as you don’t expect maximum detail in your results.

£209.99/$315, garmin.com | Amazon

10. Apple Watch Series 2 – Best for style

The best GPS running watches

The Series 2 (not the Apple Watch 2) is a sportier smartwatch than its predecessor and that’s because it’s finally thrown built-in GPS into the mix. That means you can track runs (distance, pace and speed) as well as cycling sessions.

While you’ll want to opt for third-party apps (Workout is still data-light for runners), the heart rate sensor stood up well to the rigours of testing. It’s far from perfect, but still capable of returning useful data, training within zones, and getting feedback on HIIT sessions.

The Series 2 also comes in a new Nike+ edition, which adds a perforated rubber strap and comes with custom software and watch faces. It’ll also provide coaching plans to get the most out of your running sessions.

From £369/$555, apple.com | Amazon

11. Garmin Forerunner 935 – Best for tri

The best GPS running watches

The Forerunner 935 is designed for triathletes, taking some of the new tracking skills packed into the Fenix 5 and putting them into a smaller body. Sitting at the top of the Forerunner family, above the Forerunner 735XT and Forerunner 235 watches, it’ll record most forms of running including trail sessions, includes a heart rate sensor and will dish out data to give you an insight into the effects of your training.

It’s also compatible with Garmin’s new Running Dynamics Pod, which delivers six running dynamics including cadence, ground contact time, stride length and more.

£469.99/$705, garmin.com | Amazon

New running watches incoming in 2017 – Polar M430

The best GPS running watches

Successor to the Polar M400, the M430 takes the GPS watch and aims to make improvements to its heart rate tracking skills and coverage when you need to take the training indoors. There’s now a six-LED heart rate sensor to give heart rate readings an accuracy boost and a new accelerometer/algorithm setup should make treadmill tracking more reliable too. The new notification support should also make it a more useful alternative to a dedicated smartwatch. Keep a look out for our in-depth review in the near future.

€229, polar.com

(wareable.com, https://goo.gl/f4hX5P)

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