Nikon D850 Image Quality Comparison vs Nikon D810, Canon 5D IV, Canon 5DS R, Fuji GFX, and Sony A7R III

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Pros
  • New full-frame backside illuminated 45.7-megapixel CMOS sensor
  • Class-leading resolution
  • Excellent dynamic range
  • Very good high ISO performance
  • Improved JPEG image quality compared to predecessor
  • Very quick startup
  • Very fast AF speed
  • Low shutter lag and cycle times
  • Fast 7 fps burst mode
  • Very fast 9 fps burst mode with optional MB-D18 battery grip and EN-EL18b battery
  • Deep buffers with very fast clearing when using fast XQD card
  • Low vibration mechanical shutter
  • Electronic front-curtain shutter now available with optical viewfinder in Q and QC modes
  • All-electronic shutter is available in live view mode
  • Larger optical viewfinder (but see Con regarding coverage)
  • Tilting 3.2-inch high-res touchscreen LCD
  • Outstanding battery life
  • Dual card slots (XQD and SD UHS-II)
  • Auto AF fine-tuning (but still only one setting per lens)
  • Weather-sealed magnesium alloy body
  • Improved ergonomics over D810
  • Illuminated buttons
  • New “Keep White” Auto WB mode
  • Built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth
  • Automatic Focus Shift mode for focus stacking
  • Full-width 4K videos up to 30 fps
  • Very nice 4K quality
  • Slow-motion Full HD videos at 120 fps
  • External mic and headphone jacks
  • Lossless compression option for RAW files (unlike some competitors)
  • L/M/S RAW file size options
  • In-camera RAW batch processing
  • Simultaneous 4K HDMI output and internal recording
  • 4K time-lapse movies in-camera (8K requires third party software)
  • Focus peaking for Full HD/HD movies or stills in live view mode
  • Adjustable Zebra patterns for video highlights
Cons
  • Optical viewfinder tested at only about 98% coverage
  • Limited AF point coverage when using optical viewfinder
  • Live view/movie mode still uses slow and clumsy contrast-detect AF
  • 30 minute video clip limit
  • Focus peaking & electronic VR not supported for 4K video
  • No 4K @ 60fps
  • No AF illuminator
  • No built-in flash
  • Top shutter speed still limited to 1/8000 when using electronic shutter
  • Lack of low-pass filter makes it more prone to moiré with certain subjects
  • Rear directional pad feels mushy and at times unresponsive
  • Built-in Wi-Fi (SnapBridge) has improved, but it’s still a sluggish experience

Nikon D850 Review -- Field Test Product Image

Basic Specifications
Full model name: Nikon D850
Resolution: 45.70 Megapixels
Sensor size: 35mm
(35.9mm x 23.9mm)
Kit Lens: n/a
Viewfinder: Optical / LCD
Native ISO: 64 – 25,600
Extended ISO: 32 – 102,400
Shutter: 1/8000 – 30 seconds
Dimensions: 5.7 x 4.9 x 3.1 in.
(146 x 124 x 79 mm)
Weight: 32.3 oz (915 g)
Availability: 09/2017
Manufacturer: Nikon

Product Image

We compare the Nikon D850’s JPEG image quality a various ISOs to that of its predecessor’s, the Nikon D810, as well as to a number of competing DSLRs or mirrorless cameras: the Canon 5D Mark IV, Canon 5DS R, Fuji GFX and Sony A7R III.

Nikon D850 versus Nikon D810 at Base ISO

Nikon D850 at ISO 64
Nikon D810 at ISO 64
Nikon D850 at ISO 64
Nikon D810 at ISO 64
Nikon D850 at ISO 64
Nikon D810 at ISO 64

Above we compare the new 45.7-megapixel Nikon D850 to its predecessor, the 36.3-megapixel D810 at base ISO. It’s easy to see that the D850 definitely resolves more detail than the D810, as it should. Noise levels from the D850 appear to be similar if not a touch lower, which bodes well for high ISO performance. The D810 produces better contrast in our tricky red-leaf swatch, however there are also much stronger moiré patterns. Neither camera has an anti-aliasing filter and aliasing artifacts will of course vary with resolution, distance and subject matter, so this is not really a surprise. Processing remains similar, with both cameras producing very sharp, crisp images but with visible sharpening halos around high-contrast edges. Colors are pleasing from both cameras, though the D850’s are a bit warmer and saturation of most colors is a bit higher.

Nikon D850 versus Canon 5D IV at Base ISO

Nikon D850 at ISO 64
Canon 5D IV at ISO 100
Nikon D850 at ISO 64
Canon 5D IV at ISO 100
Nikon D850 at ISO 64
Canon 5D IV at ISO 100

Although the Nikon D850 offers a ~50% higher pixel count than the 30.4-megapixel Canon 5D Mark IV, we decided to compare them anyway, since they are similarly priced and can both shoot 4K video. (Below we compare the D850 to the higher resolution Canon 5DS R.) Here we see the D850 easily out-resolves the 5D Mark IV, though noise levels are a bit higher from the Nikon. The Nikon image is also a lot crisper, mostly thanks to better default processing. Once again, the lower resolution 5D IV shows stronger moiré patterns in our red-leaf swatch despite having an optical low-pass filter, however the D850 shows stronger aliasing in other areas of our test scene. Both cameras produce pleasing colors, though the Nikon’s colors are generally more saturated and warmer.

Nikon D850 versus Canon 5DS R at Base ISO

Nikon D850 at ISO 64
Canon 5DS R at ISO 100
Nikon D850 at ISO 64
Canon 5DS R at ISO 100
Nikon D850 at ISO 64
Canon 5DS R at ISO 100

Here we can see the tables are turned with the 50.6-megapixel Canon 5DS R capturing a bit more detail than the Nikon D850, however the Nikon image is crisper with higher contrast, though sharpening halos are more evident. Noise levels are roughly similar except in the deep shadows where the Canon is noisier. Both cameras produce pleasing color, however the Nikon’s is again more saturated and warmer.

Nikon D850 versus Fuji GFX at Base ISO

Nikon D850 at ISO 64
Fuji GFX at ISO 100
Nikon D850 at ISO 64
Fuji GFX at ISO 100
Nikon D850 at ISO 64
Fuji GFX at ISO 100

We’ve decided to include the 51.4-megapixel medium format Fuji GFX as sort of a benchmark here, even though it is roughly twice the price and doesn’t offer nearly the type of performance that the D850 does. Also be aware that the GFX’s sensor has a 4:3 aspect ratio while the rest in this group have a 3:2 aspect ratio, so the GFX has more of a resolution advantage over the others than their relative pixel counts would imply here, as we frame this shot vertically. (The D850 and GFX both produce images with 8256 pixels in the horizontal axis, but the Fuji yields 6192 pixels in the vertical, versus 5504 pixels for the Nikon.) As you can see, the GFX handily out-resolves the D850 and has lower noise levels as well. Both offer very crisp images, but the Fuji generates less obvious sharpening halos around high-contrast edges. The Nikon produces higher contrast though, particularly in our tricky red-leaf swatch. Both cameras offer pleasing, vibrant color though again the Nikon is a bit warmer and overall the Fuji’s colors are a little more accurate.

Nikon D850 versus Sony A7R III at Base ISO

Nikon D850 at ISO 64
Sony A7R III at ISO 100
Nikon D850 at ISO 64
Sony A7R III at ISO 100
Nikon D850 at ISO 64
Sony A7R III at ISO 100

Here we compare the D850 to the 42.4-megapixel Sony A7R Mark III. Although the D850 has slightly higher resolution, both resolve very similar amounts of detail and produce very crisp images, however the Sony image contains fewer sharpening artifacts due to its more sophisticated sharpening algorithm. Contrast is noticeably higher from the Sony in our tricky red-leaf swatch as well. Both produce good color, however the Nikon’s is a bit warmer overall.

Nikon D850 versus Nikon D810 at ISO 6400

Nikon D850 at ISO 6400
Nikon D810 at ISO 6400
Nikon D850 at ISO 6400
Nikon D810 at ISO 6400
Nikon D850 at ISO 6400
Nikon D810 at ISO 6400

Here we jump up to ISO 6400 to get an idea of how high ISO performance compares. At ISO 6400, luminance noise appears to be a bit lower from the D850, while chrominance noise is much lower than the D810. This is likely why the D810 holds onto a lot more detail in our troublesome red-leaf swatch than the D850. In most other areas, the D850 still manages to resolve more detail, however its resolution advantage isn’t as much as it was at base ISO. Still, a very nice improvement over the D810 overall.

Nikon D850 versus Canon 5D IV at ISO 6400

Nikon D850 at ISO 6400
Canon 5D IV at ISO 6400
Nikon D850 at ISO 6400
Canon 5D IV at ISO 6400
Nikon D850 at ISO 6400
Canon 5D IV at ISO 6400

Noise levels are lower from the Canon 5D Mark IV as expected, however the D850 still manages to resolve more detail with better clarity in most areas. Both struggle with our difficult red-leaf swatch, however the Canon holds onto more of the leaf pattern while the Nikon still retains some of the thread pattern. Again, colors are a little warmer from the Nikon.

Nikon D850 versus Canon 5DS R at ISO 6400

Nikon D850 at ISO 6400
Canon 5DS R at ISO 6400
Nikon D850 at ISO 6400
Canon 5DS R at ISO 6400
Nikon D850 at ISO 6400
Canon 5DS R at ISO 6400

Luminance noise is much higher from the 5DS R here at ISO 6400 though the Canon manages to retain a bit more high-contrast detail than the Nikon. Noise reduction artifacts are however more apparent from the Canon giving fine detail a somewhat crunchy, stippled appearance. The Nikon does slightly better with our red-leaf swatch, though both blur most of the leaf pattern away, however the Canon retains more detail in the pink fabric.

Nikon D850 versus Fuji GFX at ISO 6400

Nikon D850 at ISO 6400
Fuji GFX at ISO 6400
Nikon D850 at ISO 6400
Fuji GFX at ISO 6400
Nikon D850 at ISO 6400
Fuji GFX at ISO 6400

The Fujifilm GFX easily bests the Nikon D850 here at ISO 6400, with much better detail, lower noise and a tighter noise “grain,” though contrast is a bit higher from the D850. However, as mentioned in our GFX review, the Fuji requires about 2/3 EV longer exposures than most cameras so keep that in mind. Still, even when comparing to the D850 at ISO 3200, the GFX comes out ahead thanks to its larger pixels and more sophisticated processing.

Nikon D850 versus Sony A7R III at ISO 6400

Nikon D850 at ISO 6400
Sony A7R III at ISO 6400
Nikon D850 at ISO 6400
Sony A7R III at ISO 6400
Nikon D850 at ISO 6400
Sony A7R III at ISO 6400

The Nikon D850 image is softer and less detailed here at ISO 6400 with slightly higher luminance noise, however chroma noise is lower, some low-contrast edges are better defined, and colors are warmer than from the Sony A7R III. Overall, we’d say the Sony comes out ahead here, though it’s really up to personal preference.

High-Contrast Detail: Nikon D850 versus Nikon D810, Canon 5D IV, Canon 5DS R, Fuji GFX, and Sony A7R III

Base ISO
ISO 6400
ISO 12,800
Nikon D850
Base ISO: 64
Nikon D810
Base ISO: 64
Canon 5D IV
Base ISO: 100
Canon 5DS R
Base ISO: 100
Fuji GFX
Base ISO: 100
Sony A7R III
Base ISO: 100
Detail comparison. High-contrast detail is also important, pushing the camera in different ways, so we like to look at it separately. Here, we can see the D850 offers a noticeable improvement over the D810, especially as ISO climbs, producing far fewer false colors in the stripped lettering at the higher ISOs. The D850 easily bests the Canon 5D Mark IV in both resolution and sharpness as expected, and it also exhibits much less image quality degradation at the higher ISOs. The Canon 5DS R outresolves the D850 at base ISO while producing fewer sharpening artifacts, however the 5DS R’s contrast is lower and its image quality degrades due to noise much more quickly at high ISOs. The Fuji GFX comes out ahead in terms of resolving power in this group, but as mentioned that’s partially because of its 4:3 aspect ratio. Its output gets a little softer than the D850’s as ISO rises, however performance at high ISOs is still excellent. The Sony A7R III does very well here, producing sharp, crisp images with the fewest sharpening artifacts. Resolution and contrast are not quite as high as the D850’s, but both cameras do very well with high-contrast detail here.

(imaging-resource.com, http://bit.ly/2xFotVk)

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