Canon EOS M10 Review

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SUMMARY

Canon’s first true entry-level mirrorless camera, the EOS M10, combines good image quality with a user-friendly design and great touchscreen interface. With that said, its affordable price point does lead to some compromises in terms of both design and performance. There’s no viewfinder, limited physical controls and continuous autofocus and shooting performance are limited. It is nonetheless a compelling option for beginner photographers.

PROS

User-friendly design; great touchscreen interface; good image quality

CONS

No viewfinder; limited physical controls; sub-par continuous shooting; lacking video features

PRICE AND AVAILABILITY

Available since November 2015, the Canon EOS M10 with a 15-45mm kit lens costs just under $450.

Kết quả hình ảnh cho Canon EOS M10

Basic Specifications
Full model name: Canon EOS M10
Resolution: 18.00 Megapixels
Sensor size: APS-C
(22.3mm x 14.9mm)
Kit Lens: 3.00x zoom
15-45mm
(24-72mm eq.)
Viewfinder: No / LCD
Native ISO: 100 – 12,800
Extended ISO: 100 – 25,600
Shutter: 1/4000 – 30 seconds
Max Aperture: 3.5 (kit lens)
Dimensions: 4.3 x 2.6 x 1.4 in.
(108 x 67 x 35 mm)
Weight: 10.6 oz (301 g)
includes batteries
Availability: 11/2015
Manufacturer: Canon
Full specs: Canon EOS M10 specifications

For the first time, Canon has expanded its EOS mirrorless camera line with a second, concurrent model. With past models, each new successor replaced the one before it, but with the Canon EOS M10, the Japanese camera maker is offering an additional, more entry-level model to sit beneath the beefier, more complex EOS M3.

Canon EOS M10 Review -- Product Image

The goal of the EOS M10 is to provide step-up users — be it from just a smartphone or from a compact camera — with interchangeable-lens camera image quality and features in a compact and easy to use package.

Borrowing many of the features and design from the earlier Canon EOS M2, which never officially made it to US shores, the EOS M10 takes a step beyond the M2 with a newer image processor and improved image quality, as well as some cosmetic and operability enhancements.

Let’s dive into the details!

Starting with the heart of the camera, the image sensor, the Canon EOS M10 takes a small step down from its bigger sibling in terms of sheer megapixel count. The Canon M10 utilizes an 18-megapixel APS-C CMOS sensor, which is the same resolution as the original EOS M and M2. (The EOS M3, on the other hand, offers a bump up to a 24.2-megapixel chip.)

However, while the EOS M10 shares the same sensor resolution as the original Canon EOS M, the chip has been updated with improved on-sensor autofocus. Unlike the original EOS M camera, which used Canon’s first-generation Hybrid CMOS AF system with combined on-sensor phase-detect and contrast-detect autofocus, the Canon EOS M10 uses the company’s faster, more advanced Hybrid CMOS AF II system — similar to the EOS M2 and Canon SL1.

Canon EOS M10 Review -- Product Image

The Hybrid CMOS AF II system in the EOS M10 provides 49 total AF points, a bump up from 31 AF points in the M2. Autofocus coverage spans about 70% by 80% of the total image frame area, which makes it easier to compose shots and get the focus point right where you want it.

As for image quality improvements, one of the major upgrades to the EOS M10 is the inclusion of Canon’s DIGIC 6 image processor. According to Canon, the newer processor greatly improves the noise performance of the M10 compared to the M2. For example, Canon claims ISO 1600 images should have similar noise performance as ISO 400 shots on the EOS M2 — a two-stop improvement for JPEGs as well as videos. RAW image quality, however, is said to be relatively unchanged.

Since the EOS M2 never came to the US and hence we’ve not reviewed it, we can’t judge these claims. We can say, though, that while we saw minimal improvements in noise levels and overall image quality versus the original EOS M, the EOS M10 still turns in a fairly respectable performance by entry-level standards.

Like the previous EOS M models, the ISO sensitivity range begins at 100 and tops-out at 12,800, though you can expand the maximum ISO a step higher to 25,600.

Canon EOS M10 Review -- Product Image

Also like the earlier EOS M2, the continuous burst shooting rate is still pegged at 4.6 frames per second with autofocus, and maximum video resolutions and frame rates are also unchanged — up to 1080/30p and 720/60p, as well as PAL-specific frame rates (24fps is also available).

The EOS M10 gains the M3’s Creative Assist mode, which provides users the ability to tweak image parameters like sharpening and contrast, but in an easy to use, real-time, on-screen preview with touch-based sliders. The camera also gains the Hybrid Auto mode, which captures a few moments of video simultaneously along with a still image.

As with most of Canon’s more recent camera offerings, the M10 also has Wi-Fi and NFC wireless connectivity that is compatible with the Canon Camera Connect app (iOS and Android) for both file transfer and remote control operation. The camera is also compatible with the Canon Connect Station CS100 home media device.

Canon EOS M10 Review -- Product Image
Blended: The Canon EOS M10 shares a similar 180-degree tilting touchscreen LCD like the G7X.

On the physical side of things, the Canon EOS M10 looks like a sleek blend of the original EOS M and the PowerShot G7X. The camera itself is very compact and lightweight, with its physical properties nearly identical to those of the original M.

The controls on the Canon EOS M10 are very minimal — even more so than on the original EOS M. Like the original, there is no standard Mode Dial, but rather a simpler three-way switch on the top deck which powers-on the camera and places it in one of three shooting modes: full auto (Scene Intelligent Auto), stills mode and video mode. To select other available shooting modes, such as Aperture- or Shutter-Priority, you’ll need to use the touchscreen interface. Around the shutter release button is the camera’s single control dial, which is used to adjust shooting settings like aperture or shutter speed, depending on the mode. Lastly, there is a small movie record button to the right of the shutter release.

Canon EOS M10 Review -- Product Image

Original M/M2 owners will notice the lack of a hot shoe — therefore making the M10 incompatible with Canon’s Speedlite flash system. However, unlike these earlier models, the M10 gains a pop-up flash.

Like the Canon G7X, the M10 has a full 180-degree tilting rear touchscreen panel. The 3.0-inch touch-screen LCD monitor features a 1.04-million dot resolution just as in the G7X and features the traditional array of Canon touch panel amenities like tap-to-focus and touch-shutter.

Canon EOS M10 Review -- Product Image

And speaking of the touch-screen, it’s a great feature to have on this camera, given the scarcity of physical control dials and buttons. Apart from the screen, the rear of the camera is quite sparse in terms of controls. Gone, even, is the secondary control wheel that surrounded the 4-way control button of the original M and M2 cameras — it’s now just a 4-way button. Apart from this control cluster button, only two other buttons sit on the rear of the camera: the menu and playback buttons.

Other physical controls consist of a small flash release on the left side of the camera and a Mobile Device Connect button on the right side.

Canon EOS M10 Review -- Product Image
Canon EOS M10 Review -- Product Image
Bottom: The rear controls of the Canon EOS M10 (left) compared to the original EOS M (right).

 

Canon EOS M10 Review -- Product Image

A High-Speed USB 2.0 port is provided for connecting to a computer or printer, as well as a Mini HDMI (Type-C) port for playback on an HDTV. Unlike the M and M2 cameras, the M10 does not have an external microphone input jack (which isn’t all that surprising given the lack of a hot shoe to mount an external mic).

The Canon EOS M10 derives its power from a proprietary LP-E12 lithiium-ion battery pack, which is CIPA-rated for only 255 shots per charge. In-camera charging is not supported, so a dedicated LC-E12 battery charger is included in the bundle.

Canon EOS M10 Review -- Product Image

Images and videos are stored on a single SD/SDHC/SDXC card, and the Canon M10 includes support for UHS-I types.

Canon EOS M10 Field Test

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image

187mm equivalent (Canon EF-M 55-200mm f/4.5-6.3 IS STM lens at 117mm), f/5.0, 1/800s, ISO 100.

Introduction

The Canon EOS M10 marks the first time that Canon expanded its mirrorless camera lineup to include more than one current camera. Joining the higher-resolution and more sophisticated EOS M3, the M10 is best described as the entry-level model in Canon’s mirrorless lineup. The M10 provides a simple, user-friendly experience while still offering more advanced photographers a number of creative opportunities, although limited in some respects.

Canon EOS M10 Key Features
  • 18.0-megapixel CMOS APS-C sensor
  • Mirrorless
  • Compact 10.6-ounce body with simple controls
  • Tilting 3.0-inch rear touchscreen display
  • Native ISO range of 100-12800, expandable to 25600
  • Hybrid CMOS AF II with on sensor phase detect, 49 AF zones
  • 1080/30p video
  • Built-in Wi-Fi and NFC
Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Product Image Front
The Canon EOS M10 shown here with the optional grip accessory attached.
The Canon EOS M10 offers a simple but decent camera body

The first thing you’ll notice when you pick up the Canon M10 is that there are not very many controls. There’s a control dial around the shutter release on the top of the camera, a movie record button next to that, a switch to toggle between video, stills and full auto, and a couple of buttons and a directional pad on the rear of the M10. Without many buttons, there are times when controlling the camera can be a little deliberate and slow. You’ll come to rely on the touch-screen-friendly Quick Menu a lot for changing numerous camera settings.

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Product Image Back

The control dial has a nice feel to it, but it would be good to have a second one somewhere on the camera, even if it were around the directional buttons like there is on the EOS M3. You’ll notice that there’s not a traditional mode dial on the M10; selecting modes like Program, Aperture-priority, Shutter-priority and Manual requires the use of the touchscreen. This isn’t too bad, however, because the touchscreen works really well. The 3.0-inch display has 1,040,000 dots, and the 180-degree upward tilting mechanism moves smoothly and feels surprisingly robust.

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Product Image Back

Notably absent is any sort of electronic viewfinder or hotshoe for attaching an external viewfinder. The lack of a hotshoe (and resulting inability to attach Canon’s optional EVF-DC1) is a rather large difference between the M10 and its more capable sibling. The rear display works well in most situations, but a viewfinder is hard to beat when it’s sunny out or when you’re using a longer lens.

Despite the price, the EOS M10’s build quality is quite nice, and it feels very solid in the hand. On its own, the slim, candy-bar shape is very compact but can be a little slippery to hold. For under $30, you can purchase an optional Grip GR-E3 for the M10. I highly recommend doing so because the grip doesn’t add much weight to the body, but it makes the M10 much more comfortable to hold.

Overall, particularly with the optional grip, the M10 offers a comfortable camera body that won’t overwhelm novice users with complicated controls. It’s a very simple camera to operate and the touchscreen interface works well. Fortunately, it doesn’t eschew more serious shooting controls, it just puts them in the Quick Menu.

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
24mm equivalent (Canon EF-M 15-45mm f/3.5-6.3 IS STM lens at 15mm), f/3.5, 1/250s, ISO 800.This image has been modified. 

The EOS M10’s APS-C sensor does a fine job

With about six fewer megapixels than the M3, the M10’s 18-megapixel APS-C CMOS sensor still captures high-quality images. Eighteen megapixels is plenty for most uses and the image quality is good. Paired with Canon’s DIGIC 6 image processor, the M10 is designed to offer a full two-stop improvement in high ISO performance compared to the EOS M2, at least for JPEG images. The new processing doesn’t apply to the camera’s RAW images. On the plus side, the M10 can record 14-bit uncompressed RAW files, which is nice.

Dynamic range is a weak area for the M10. DxOMark found that the sensor has only 11.4 EVs of dynamic range, which is a fair bit less than some other competing APS-C sensors out there. I found that I was still able to make quite a good level of exposure adjustments to RAW files from the M10, but the files certainly provided less leniency than other cameras I’ve used — including some with smaller sensors.

EF-M 15-45mm kit lens is okay, but has a lot of distortion

The M10 is sold with an EF-M 15-45mm f/3.5-6.3 IS STM kit lens, which offers basically a 24-72mm equivalent focal length. It’s a compact zoom lens (it’s only 1.76 inches long), and works well for landscapes, portraits and general shooting. The lens does exhibit a lot of distortion and vignetting at the wide end, so keep that in mind. It’s unfortunate that it’s so slow at the telephoto end (f/6.3) — though it does have image stabilization to help compensate — but overall, it’s an okay kit lens.

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
30mm equivalent (Canon EF-M 15-45mm f/3.5-6.3 IS STM lens at 19mm), f/4.0, 1/50s, ISO 100.

The touchscreen display makes the Canon EOS M10 enjoyable to use

The camera offers a lot of options to the user, but it doesn’t have a lot of buttons or dials to worry about. Offering a good user experience, the Canon M10 feels like a camera designed for users who are becoming more serious about photography and want the ability to change lenses. Many features are accessible through the touchscreen, which is very user-friendly and easy to understand. I like that the camera body itself is so straightforward, but enthusiasts who want fast access and more physical controls for settings might not be satisfied with this simple design.

Metering

The M10 provides strong metering performance through its evaluative, partial, center-weighted and spot metering options. Partial meters approximately 11% of the center of the frame, and spot metering meters approximately 2.8% of the frame. Spot metering is, unfortunately, locked to the center of the frame and does not move based on the AF point.

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
320mm equivalent (Canon EF-M 55-200mm f/4.5-6.3 IS STM lens at 200mm), f/6.3, 1/315s, ISO 125This image has been modified. 

When the camera doesn’t meter as expected or you desire exposure compensation, you can press up on the directional pad on the rear of the body and access up to three EVs of compensation. Auto white balance worked well in my experience, providing consistently good results in a wide variety of situations, although the camera did have a slight tendency to reduce naturally warm tones in a scene.

Shooting Modes

It is clear by the lack of a mode dial that the camera is aimed at users who will often use the camera in a fully-automatic shooting mode. The camera works well in a fully-automatic shooting mode due to its reliable metering and autofocus performance. If you want to utilize P, A, S and M shooting modes, you need to access them via the touchscreen. When in aperture and shutter priority modes, the control dial on the top of the camera works perfectly well for adjusting your settings. When shooting in the fully manual mode, however, the camera body’s limitations become apparent, and you have to toggle between which setting (aperture or shutter speed) the dial is controlling, making manual shooting quite tedious.

Touch-screen and menus

When shooting, the display can be set to show you a variety of settings and options. In the top left corner is the shooting mode (M, Av, Tv and P). The top right has the “Q” menu which lists eleven settings, six on each side (the top right corner is “back” to go back to the shooting screen) of the display with the central area dedicated to describing the setting and providing additional information. The settings are AF method, AF operation (One Shot versus Servo), image quality, video quality, drive mode, self-timer, white balance, picture style, auto lighting optimizer, metering and aspect ratio. None of these settings are accessible via physical buttons on the camera.

Along the bottom of the display is the aperture or shutter speed (or both when in manual mode), exposure compensation, ISO, zoom and a touch shutter toggle. By pressing up on the directional pad (which is otherwise an exposure control button) you can cycle through which of shutter speed, aperture and exposure compensation is controlled by the camera’s control dial. This is true in aperture and shutter priority as well, although you’re only cycling between two options.

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
35mm equivalent (Canon EF-M 22mm f/2.0 STM lens), f/2.0, 15s, ISO 1600.

The touch-screen works quite well in most cases, providing quick and accurate performance, however I found it to become a little sluggish when selecting between shooting modes. Otherwise it worked well, including for the camera’s system menus. A few of the on-screen buttons are small, so I found myself opting for a combination of touch and the physical buttons for system menu navigation. On the topic of the menus, they’re generally well-organized and straightforward. As a note, you can navigate the quick menu with physical buttons as well; it is not exclusively touch-based, although touch-based control is definitely faster.

It is worth noting that the camera doesn’t have a built-in focus scale on the display, so night shooting that requires manual focus (such as shooting the night sky) is a tricky task that you must perform using live view and a lot of patience. It was at times immensely frustrating to work with at night, but it can still capture pretty good night shots.

Overall

I’m usually a proponent of cameras with a lot of physical controls because I find them faster and easier to work with, but I generally liked shooting with the M10. Its simple, streamlined approach worked well given its strong metering and decent autofocus performance (more on that shortly). Sure, it’s not a high-end enthusiast camera, but it does seem well-suited to photographers who want something small and easy to use or are just getting started with their first non-point and shoot camera.

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
18mm equivalent (Canon EF-M 11-22mm f/4-5.6 IS STM lens at 11mm), f/4.5, 1/60s, ISO 400.This image has been modified. 

Autofocus performance is not the Canon EOS M10’s strong suit

The Canon EOS M10 utilizes a Hybrid CMOS AF II autofocus system, which offers both on-sensor phase-detect and contrast-detect autofocus (hence “hybrid”). The camera has 49 autofocus zones and offers multi, single point and face detection + tracking autofocus areas, and you can use the touchscreen to adjust focus.

I found that the multi area (fully automatic) autofocus area mode worked decently well, although it occasionally missed the mark in terms of picking the correct subject. In these situations, single point autofocus was a suitable remedy and proved to be relatively quick. With that said, this camera doesn’t offer blazing-fast autofocus speeds.

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
98mm equivalent (Canon EF-M 55-200mm f/4.5-6.3 IS STM lens at 61mm), f/4.5, 1/2000s, ISO 100This image has been modified. 

Continuous autofocus performance is decent, although it isn’t particularly fast. The camera can track a subject with some success, so long as it isn’t moving quickly and doesn’t blend into its surroundings. Using subject tracking occasionally leads to the camera picking up on a somewhat similar-looking object in the scene as the system is not particularly sophisticated. I found that the M10 also had a tendency to hunt for focus.

The EOS M10’s autofocus is reliable enough for many general-purpose situations, but it’s far from what I would consider useful for action, sports or anything else fast-paced. In fact, based on my experience, I’d classify its overall AF performance as rather mediocre. With that said, one needs to keep the camera’s performance in the appropriate context given the Canon EOS M10’s price point and classification as an entry-level camera. With that, it strikes me as decent mirrorless camera in terms of focusing for the money, though there are certainly better offerings out there.

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
320mm equivalent (Canon EF-M 55-200mm f/4.5-6.3 IS STM lens at 200mm), f/6.3, 1/1250s, ISO 1600This image has been cropped. 
Canon EOS M10’s performance dogged by slow burst rate & shallow buffer

Performance is about what you would expect from an entry-level camera, which is to say that it is not that great. The DIGIC 6-powered camera is slow pretty much across the board with single-shot cycling times one of the few areas where it’s roughly average. Continuous shooting performance on the Canon M10 is sluggish. When shooting JPEG files, the buffer is at least good at over 80 frames captured at just under 4.6 frames per second. However, the buffer situation worsens dramatically when recording raw files, although the burst rate only drops down to 4.2 fps. The buffer sinks to a paltry six frames for raw, and when shooting raw + JPEG the buffer goes down to just five frames. The buffer does clear in roughly three seconds, though, which is quite good.

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
35mm equivalent (Canon EF-M 11-22mm f/4-5.6 IS STM lens at 22mm), f/5.6, 1/80s, ISO 160. This image has been modified. 

It’s unfortunate that the Canon M10 is so slow to record images and that its raw buffer depth is so small, which all in all limits the M10’s usefulness at shooting any sort of action or fast-paced subjects. However, as was the case with autofocus performance, the context is important. This is an entry-level camera with an entry-level price, so it’s understandable that the M10’s performance is not going to be up to the level of a higher-end camera.

Canon M10 does surprisingly well in low light

High sensitivity

Up through ISO 1600, JPEG images straight from the camera look pretty good. At ISO 3200, the situation is a bit murkier as images lose quite a lot of sharpness due to the in-camera noise reduction. The M10 has aggressive default noise reduction, although you can adjust it or disable entirely if desired. It’s a staple of many entry-level cameras to place a strong emphasis on reducing visible noise, even at the cost of fine details and sharpness. At ISO 6400, images take on a very digital and processed appearance. At ISO 12800 and 25600, images display a severe lack of fine detail and heavy noise and are best avoided, in my opinion.

Canon M10 Noise Comparison 100% crops from JPEG images straight from the camera.

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Noise Test Image

ISO 100 Full Scene

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Noise Test Image

ISO 100 

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Noise Test Image

ISO 200

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Noise Test Image

ISO 400

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Noise Test Image

ISO 800

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Noise Test Image

ISO 1600

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Noise Test Image

ISO 3200

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Noise Test Image

ISO 6400

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Noise Test Image

ISO 12800

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Noise Test Image

ISO H (25600)

RAW images look pretty good at ISO 1600, though there’s a fair amount of noise. Contrast and detail are still good at this sensitivity, and you can process the file into something completely usable for moderately large viewing sizes and prints. ISO 6400 results in a large falloff in sharpness and a dramatic increase in visible noise, but I could see myself utilizing a processed RAW file at ISO 6400 for web display. All in all, high ISO performance is decent with the EOS M10. Its APS-C sensor does a good job and despite noise reduction being heavy-handed in-camera, its RAW files are pretty good for a camera of its class.

Canon M10 RAW samples – 100% center crops from RAW images
(Using Adobe Camera Raw defaults.)

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Noise Test Image

ISO 100

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Noise Test Image

ISO 1600

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Noise Test Image

ISO 6400

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Noise Test Image

ISO 25600

In lieu of having a hotshoe, the M10 offers a built-in flash. It’s moderately powerful and is certainly powerful enough to provide good fill flash during the day, as you can see in the images below. I would rather the camera have a hotshoe (or both a hotshoe and a built-in flash, ideally), but it’s an entry-level camera so I’m not surprised at the omission.Built-in flash

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
62mm equivalent (Canon EF-M 15-45mm f/3.5-6.3 IS STM lens at 39mm), f/5.6, 1/125s, ISO 800, flash.

Video: What’s here is good but what’s missing is unfortunate

Video is something of a disappointment with the Canon M10, unfortunately. You can’t record any sort of 4K video — not that surprising, given the other current offerings of EOS models — and 1080p resolution video is only offered at 24 and 30 frames per second. This is well below what I’ve come to expect from modern mirrorless cameras. There’s no headphone jack, but at least there’s a microphone jack — though no hot-shoe to attach an external mic.

Canon M10 Video Sample #1, 1920 x 1080, 30fps

Autofocus performance when recording video is okay, but can be somewhat slow. I like being able to quietly move the focus point around the frame using the tilting touchscreen display, though. Exposure performance was consistently good, as was automatic white balance.

Canon M10 Video Sample #2, 1920 x 1080, 30fps

Movie modes are somewhat lacking as well. Your options are either a fully automatic movie mode (although you can still control autofocus if you so choose) and a manual movie mode. If you start a movie recording while in aperture or shutter priority, the camera enters automatic mode.

At high sensitivities, video looks pretty good through ISO 1600, although it becomes quite soft at ISO 3200. The softness is joined by noticeable noise at ISO 6400, but the 1080p resolution cap masks some of the issues.

Canon M10 ISO 3200 Video Sample, 1920 x 1080, 30fps

Overall, the video features that are present work fairly well. I wish that autofocus performance was a bit better, but the camera works quite well for its class in fully automatic mode. Obviously the lack of 4K or even 1080/60p video is disappointing.

Built-in Wi-Fi and NFC work with Canon Camera Connect app

The Canon M10 has built-in Wi-Fi and NFC and can establish a connection via the dedicated wireless button on the side of the camera to both iOS and Android devices. I tested the wireless functionality on an iOS device, which means that I had to go through iOS’s wireless settings menu before being able to connect to the camera. Once up and running, though, performance was good. The connection was stable, and the live view display on my phone’s screen was close to real-time.

Canon Camera Connect application screenshots

Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Wireless App ScreenshotCanon M10 Review: Field Test -- Wireless App Screenshot

Canon EOS M10 Field Test SummaryThere are quite a few options and controls available in the Canon Camera Connect application, including drive mode and autofocus settings, and the touchscreen works well for selecting focus. It’s a relatively standard assortment of features, similar to those with other EOS cameras with wireless capabilities, and offers good remote control functionality; I can certainly see the utility of the app when using the M10, especially for things like family portraits.

What I like:

  • Tilting touchscreen display
  • Intuitive to use
  • Built-in flash
  • Price point
  • Can work with non EF-M Canon lenses with an adapter

What I dislike:

  • No available electronic viewfinder
  • Only one control dial
  • Mediocre autofocus
  • Poor continuous shooting performance
  • No hotshoe
  • No 4K or 60fps Full HD video
  • Below average battery life (rated for 255 shots/charge)
Canon M10 Review: Field Test -- Gallery Image
24mm equivalent (Canon EF-M 15-45mm f/3.5-6.3 IS STM lens at 15mm), f/3.5, 1/60s, ISO 250 – This image has been modified. 

Offering a simple, effective user experience, the Canon EOS M10 is not equipped to rattle off a big burst of raw images or to record 4K video, but it can easily capture fine images at a fairly wide range of sensitivities. When considering the Canon EOS M10, you need to keep your expectations in check with its entry-level status (and price point). Right now, you can purchase an M10 with the 15-45mm kit lens for only $450 ($150 less than MSRP). Considering its good image quality and intuitive, simple controls, it strikes me as a good option for someone looking to make the upgrade to his or her first interchangeable lens camera, while still keeping everything lightweight and compact.

Canon EOS M10 Image Quality Comparison

Below are crops from our laboratory Still Life target comparing Canon EOS M10 image quality to the original EOS M (sorry, the M2 was not released in the US and thus didn’t make it into our lab), its more expensive sibling the EOS M3, as well as against several other entry-level mirrorless cameras: the Olympus E-PL7, Panasonic GF7 and Sony A5100.

NOTE: These images are from best quality JPEGs straight out of the camera, at default settings including noise reduction and using the camera’s actual base ISO (not extended ISO settings). All cameras in this comparison were shot with our very sharp reference lenses. Clicking any crop will take you to a carrier page where you can click once again to access the full resolution image as delivered straight from the camera. For those interested in working with the RAW files involved, click these links to visit each camera’s respective sample image thumbnail page:Canon EOS M10, Canon EOS M, Canon EOS M3, Olympus E-PL7, Panasonic GF7 and Sony A5100 — links to the RAW files appear beneath those for the JPEG images, wherever we have them. And remember, you can always go to our world-renowned Comparometer to compare the Canon EOS M10 to any camera we’ve ever tested!

Canon EOS M10 vs Canon EOS M at Base ISO
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 100 100% crop from Canon EOS M test image taken at ISO 100
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 100 100% crop from Canon EOS M test image taken at ISO 100
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 100 100% crop from Canon EOS M test image taken at ISO 100
Canon EOS M10 at ISO 100
Canon EOS M at ISO 100

Here, we compare the original 18-megapixel Canon EOS M which came out in 2012 to the 18-megapixel Canon EOS M10. As you can see, apart from brighter, more pleasing colors from the newer model, image quality is very similar here at base ISO.

Canon EOS M10 vs Canon EOS M3 at Base ISO
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 100 100% crop from Canon EOS M3 test image taken at ISO 100
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 100 100% crop from Canon EOS M3 test image taken at ISO 100
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 100 100% crop from Canon EOS M3 test image taken at ISO 100
Canon EOS M10 at ISO 100
Canon EOS M3 at ISO 100

Above we compare the M10 to its bigger brother, the 24-megapixel EOS M3. The M3 does resolve a bit more detail as expected, but the M10 produces slightly nicer colors. Otherwise image quality is quite similar although the M10 renders the red-leaf pattern a bit better than the M3. The latter resolves more of the fine thread pattern which likely gets treated as noise, degrading the leaf pattern a little more than the M10.

Canon EOS M10 vs Olympus E-PL7 at Base ISO
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 100 100% crop from Olympus E-PL7 test image taken at ISO 200
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 100 100% crop from Olympus E-PL7 test image taken at ISO 200
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 100 100% crop from Olympus E-PL7 test image taken at ISO 200
Canon EOS M10 at ISO 100
Olympus E-PL7 at ISO 200

Here we compare the 18-megapixel APS-C M10 to the 16-megapixel Micro Four Thirds Olympus E-PL7. These two cameras actually have identical vertical resolutions which is how this scene is framed, so the Canon doesn’t have a resolution advantage in this comparison. In fact, the E-PL7’s weaker anti-aliasing filter and better default sharpening give it an edge in terms of detail and crispness. Colors are more pleasing from the Canon, though, and noise slightly more visible from the Olympus, but keep in mind the E-PL7’s higher base ISO of 200.

Canon EOS M10 vs Panasonic GF7 at Base ISO
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 100 100% crop from Panasonic GF7 test image taken at ISO 200
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 100 100% crop from Panasonic GF7 test image taken at ISO 200
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 100 100% crop from Panasonic GF7 test image taken at ISO 200
Canon EOS M10 at ISO 100
Panasonic GF7 at ISO 200

Here’s another comparison with a 16-megapixel Micro Four Thirds camera, the Panasonic GF7. Again, both cameras have very similar vertical resolutions and therefore resolve very similar levels of detail, but the Panasonic’s more conservative default sharpening and contrast make its image look a bit soft and less punchy compared to the Canon’s, and again the M10 produces better color.

Canon EOS M10 vs Sony A5100 at Base ISO
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 100 100% crop from Sony A5100 test image taken at ISO 100
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 100 100% crop from Sony A5100 test image taken at ISO 100
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 100 100% crop from Sony A5100 test image taken at ISO 100
Canon EOS M10 at ISO 100
Sony A5100 at ISO 100

The 24-megapixel APS-C Sony A5100 does resolve more detail than the 18-megapixel M10 here at base ISO, and its more advanced sharpening algorithm produces crisper fine detail while at the same time producing noticeably lower sharpening halos along high-contrast edges. Noise levels are however slightly higher from the Sony, and again, the Canon produces more pleasing colors.

Canon EOS M10 vs Canon EOS M at ISO 1600
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 1600 100% crop from Canon EOS M test image taken at ISO 1600
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 1600 100% crop from Canon EOS M test image taken at ISO 1600
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 1600 100% crop from Canon EOS M test image taken at ISO 1600
Canon EOS M10 at ISO 1600
Canon EOS M at ISO 1600

The M10 does show slightly less noise than the original M at ISO 1600, as well as some refinement in how it treats edges and transitions between different subject matter, but other than the improved color, there’s not a huge difference in image quality. Both cameras smear a lot of detail away in our tricky red-leaf swatch though contrast is a bit better from the older camera.

Canon EOS M10 vs Canon EOS M3 at ISO 1600
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 1600 100% crop from Canon EOS M3 test image taken at ISO 1600
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 1600 100% crop from Canon EOS M3 test image taken at ISO 1600
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 1600 100% crop from Canon EOS M3 test image taken at ISO 1600
Canon EOS M10 at ISO 1600
Canon EOS M3 at ISO 1600

The M3 continues to resolve a bit more detail than the M10 here at ISO 1600, though the difference isn’t as much as at base ISO. Noise levels are however higher from the M3 and again the M10 produces more pleasing colors.

Canon EOS M10 vs Olympus E-PL7 at ISO 1600
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 1600 100% crop from Olympus E-PL7 test image taken at ISO 1600
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 1600 100% crop from Olympus E-PL7 test image taken at ISO 1600
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 1600 100% crop from Olympus E-PL7 test image taken at ISO 1600
Canon EOS M10 at ISO 1600
Olympus E-PL7 at ISO 1600

The E-PL7 continues to produce a crisper image at ISO 1600 along with lower luminance noise levels, but chrominance noise is a bit higher in the shadows and noise reduction artifacts distort fine details a bit more than from the Canon. Color remains more pleasing from the Canon.

Canon EOS M10 vs Panasonic GF7 at ISO 1600
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 1600 100% crop from Panasonic GF7 test image taken at ISO 1600
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 1600 100% crop from Panasonic GF7 test image taken at ISO 1600
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 1600 100% crop from Panasonic GF7 test image taken at ISO 1600
Canon EOS M10 at ISO 1600
Panasonic GF7 at ISO 1600

Noise in flatter areas is actually lower and more fine-grained from the Panasonic, but its area-specific noise reduction leaves more noise in areas with fine detail and along edges, making them appear grainer but with slightly better detail than the Canon. Color and contrast are still superior from the Canon.

Canon EOS M10 vs Sony A5100 at ISO 1600
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 1600 100% crop from Sony A5100 test image taken at ISO 1600
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 1600 100% crop from Sony A5100 test image taken at ISO 1600
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 1600 100% crop from Sony A5100 test image taken at ISO 1600
Canon EOS M10 at ISO 1600
Sony A5100 at ISO 1600

It’s tough to pick a winner in this comparison. The Sony still resolves more detail, but while its heavy-handed noise reduction keeps noise lower than the M10, it starts to produce unwanted artifacts and softens much of the image. The Sony does a little better in our tricky fabrics, however much of the detail is distorted. And once again, the Canon produces better color.

Canon EOS M10 vs Canon EOS M at ISO 3200
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 3200 100% crop from Canon EOS M test image taken at ISO 3200
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 3200 100% crop from Canon EOS M test image taken at ISO 3200
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 3200 100% crop from Canon EOS M test image taken at ISO 3200
Canon EOS M10 at ISO 3200
Canon EOS M at ISO 3200

Similar to what we saw at ISO 1600, the M10 produces a slightly more refined-looking image with better colors, but image quality is otherwise similar.

Canon EOS M10 vs Canon EOS M3 at ISO 3200
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 3200 100% crop from Canon EOS M3 test image taken at ISO 3200
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 3200 100% crop from Canon EOS M3 test image taken at ISO 3200
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 3200 100% crop from Canon EOS M3 test image taken at ISO 3200
Canon EOS M10 at ISO 3200
Canon EOS M3 at ISO 3200

The Canon M3 is still able to resolve more high-contrast detail, but higher noise and more aggressive noise reduction negates the resolution advantage in areas with subtle detail, especially noticeable in our red-leaf fabric which has much stronger blurring than from the M10. Again, the M10 produces slightly better colors overall.

Canon EOS M10 vs Olympus E-PL7 at ISO 3200
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 3200 100% crop from Olympus E-PL7 test image taken at ISO 3200
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 3200 100% crop from Olympus E-PL7 test image taken at ISO 3200
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 3200 100% crop from Olympus E-PL7 test image taken at ISO 3200
Canon EOS M10 at ISO 3200
Olympus E-PL7 at ISO 3200

The Olympus still produces a crisper, more contrasty, yet smoother image with a finer noise “grain” here at ISO 3200, but it’s obviously working hard to suppress noise, producing more unwanted noise reduction artifacts. Colors continue to be more pleasing from the Canon.

Canon EOS M10 vs Panasonic GF7 at ISO 3200
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 3200 100% crop from Panasonic GF7 test image taken at ISO 3200
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 3200 100% crop from Panasonic GF7 test image taken at ISO 3200
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 3200 100% crop from Panasonic GF7 test image taken at ISO 3200
Canon EOS M10 at ISO 3200
Panasonic GF7 at ISO 3200

Also similar to what we saw at ISO 1600 between these two cameras, the GF7 leaves behind less noise in shadow areas but subject matter with fine detail is grainier thanks to its area-specific noise reduction compared to Canon’s more traditional approach to noise reduction. It’s a tough call as to which is better overall, but we give the edge to the Canon, which has better color as well.

Canon EOS M10 vs Sony A5100 at ISO 3200
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 3200 100% crop from Sony A5100 test image taken at ISO 3200
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 3200 100% crop from Sony A5100 test image taken at ISO 3200
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 3200 100% crop from Sony A5100 test image taken at ISO 3200
Canon EOS M10 at ISO 3200
Sony A5100 at ISO 3200

Very heavy-handed noise reduction from the A5100 makes its image quite soft and fuzzy, with a much more processed looked in flatter areas as well. Although detail looks better in our troublesome red-leaf fabric, much of it is false. And the M10 continues to produce better color.

Canon EOS M10 vs. Canon EOS M, Canon EOS M3, Olympus E-PL7, Panasonic GF7, Sony A5100
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 100 100% crop from Canon EOS M test image taken at ISO 100 100% crop from Canon EOS M3 test image taken at ISO 100 100% crop from Olympus E-PL7 test image taken at ISO 200 100% crop from Panasonic GF7 test image taken at ISO 200 100% crop from Sony A5100 test image taken at ISO 100
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 3200 100% crop from Canon EOS M test image taken at ISO 3200 100% crop from Canon EOS M3 test image taken at ISO 3200 100% crop from Olympus E-PL7 test image taken at ISO 3200 100% crop from Panasonic GF7 test image taken at ISO 3200 100% crop from Sony A5100 test image taken at ISO 3200
100% crop from Canon EOS M10 test image taken at ISO 6400 100% crop from Canon EOS M test image taken at ISO 6400 100% crop from Canon EOS M3 test image taken at ISO 6400 100% crop from Olympus E-PL7 test image taken at ISO 6400 100% crop from Panasonic GF7 test image taken at ISO 6400 100% crop from Sony A5100 test image taken at ISO 6400
Canon
EOS M10
ISO 100
ISO 3200
ISO 6400
Canon
EOS M
ISO 100
ISO 3200
ISO 6400
Canon
EOS M3
ISO 100
ISO 3200
ISO 6400
Olympus
E-PL7
ISO 200
ISO 3200
ISO 6400
Panasonic
GF7
ISO 200
ISO 3200
ISO 6400
Sony
A5100
ISO 100
ISO 3200
ISO 6400
Detail comparison. High-contrast detail is also important, pushing the camera in different ways, so we like to look at it, too. Here we can see the Canon M10 is just slightly improved over the Canon M at ISO 3200 and 6400, but the difference is very minor. At base ISO, the Sony A5100 comes out on top, with the Canon M3 a close second, but both degrade as ISO rises. The Olympus E-PL7 does very well, with very little degradation as ISO is increased. The Panasonic GF7 starts off with the lowest contrast, but it doesn’t degrade much either at higher ISOs.

(imaging-resource.com, https://goo.gl/6b2wRq)

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